Detained Chinese artist Ai Weiwei appears to be tense. No kidding.
Dissident artist Ai Weiwei in his Beijing studio
Photo: Cynthia Copper
Photo: Cynthia Copper

Radio Free Asia reports that Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei, who has not been seen since he was apprehended by Chinese authorities on April 3, 2011, has been permitted a visit by his wife, the artist Lu Qing.

Security police visited his Beijing studio on Sunday May 15 to pick Lu up and, according to his sister, Gao Ge, his health seems Ok. Tania Branigan in The Guardian reports that he also seems tense.

No kidding.

Artist Lu Qing
Photo: Agence France Presse

Liu Xiaoyuan, a lawyer, has expressed the view that the artist is being held under residential surveillance.

Joshua Rosenzweig of the Dui Hua Foundation, which supports political prisoners, is quoted as saying that residential surveillance "is supposed to be less punitive but the way it is being carried out – if it is – is really turning things on its head. It is much more advantageous to police. There are very few limits on their ability to interrogate you."

Linda Leith

.ll.


Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

More articles

Nepveu, Mavrikakis, Leblanc: Quebec’s impressive fall literary season

While the Miron biography is a considerable assessment of the one of the great figures of nationalist Quebec, the publication this month of a new novel by Catherine Mavrikakis is an event, too, and one of the surest signs of vitality among a younger generation of Quebec writers.

And then there's Perrine Leblanc, aged 31.


Catherine Mavrikakis

To Isaac Babel from his daughter

"Well, here you are at last. We've been puzzled about you for so long; although you left behind much love and devotion, you bequeathed us very few facts." -- Nathalie Babel, 1964

The Literary Life (Part 2 of 2)

Writers are always complaining they don’t have enough time to write, even those who are “full-time” writers. I used to find that puzzling, but now that I have joined the ranks of full-time writers, I understand better. The question, “When do you write?” is not a silly question. This is why writers are careful to broach it only with close friends. The answer has something to do with what I write – and a lot to do with whether I write at all.

8-Logos-bottom