Detained Chinese artist Ai Weiwei appears to be tense. No kidding.
Dissident artist Ai Weiwei in his Beijing studio
Photo: Cynthia Copper
Photo: Cynthia Copper

Radio Free Asia reports that Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei, who has not been seen since he was apprehended by Chinese authorities on April 3, 2011, has been permitted a visit by his wife, the artist Lu Qing.

Security police visited his Beijing studio on Sunday May 15 to pick Lu up and, according to his sister, Gao Ge, his health seems Ok. Tania Branigan in The Guardian reports that he also seems tense.

No kidding.

Artist Lu Qing
Photo: Agence France Presse

Liu Xiaoyuan, a lawyer, has expressed the view that the artist is being held under residential surveillance.

Joshua Rosenzweig of the Dui Hua Foundation, which supports political prisoners, is quoted as saying that residential surveillance "is supposed to be less punitive but the way it is being carried out – if it is – is really turning things on its head. It is much more advantageous to police. There are very few limits on their ability to interrogate you."

Linda Leith

.ll.


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