Mont-Royal métro
just now i was walking along Mont-Royal, enjoying the sunshine and the people. i saw two young women coming out of Métro Mont-Royal. They were wearing long black robes and their heads and faces were veiled, revealing only their eyes. their veils spangled with flashing beads, they were a striking pair. heads turned to watch them cross the plaza in front of the station. But a man - in his 60s, sportily dressed, apparently sane - rushed up to the pair and yelled in their faces that what they were wearing was "interdit maintenant." he then pulled up one woman's veil so that her entire face was visible. i shouted at the man, in French, to stop it, but he persisted in accosting them and finally i said (again in French) "if you don't stop it I'll call the police." he stalked off.
two other women (both francophone) immediately joined the veiled women and me, both of the apologizing for what had just happened. One of them said, "where are you going? I'll walk with you so that can't happen again." The veiled women were quite young, probably early 20s, and it was clear they were quite shaken by what had happened, and embarrassed to be so abruptly the center of attention. they thanked all of us for our help, and hurried on their way.

i am so ashamed to be part of a province where the head of government is fomenting such hatred for political again. it profoundly disgusts me.
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