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Q & A with Patterson Webster on Land Marks / Pays sage

Patterson Webster’s exhibition Land Marks – nicely translated as Pays sage – explores how people shape the natural world and are shaped by it. Intrigued when I attended the show and walked the trails, I asked Webster questions about her work, to which she responded by email.

Her work is exhibited in a gallery setting at the North Hatley Library (165 Main Street, North Hatley) and outdoors at Glen Villa Gardens (1000 chemin North Hatley, Sainte-Catherine–de-Hatley), where you can walk the Abenaki and In Transit trails daily, 1–5 p.m. Enter the property on the private drive marked with a flag. Follow signs for parking. See brochure and map. Duration of walk: 45 minutes (1.5 km) round trip.

The Literary Life (Part 2 of 2)

Writers are always complaining they don’t have enough time to write, even those who are “full-time” writers. I used to find that puzzling, but now that I have joined the ranks of full-time writers, I understand better. The question, “When do you write?” is not a silly question. This is why writers are careful to broach it only with close friends. The answer has something to do with what I write – and a lot to do with whether I write at all.

Gaudy is Good: Bath and Brighton Pier, part III, by Kenneth Radu

The carousel towards the latter end of the Brighton Pier, just before the roller coaster, is grotesquely beautiful, and enthrals the children and older bystanders for that reason. So vividly painted, the horses eerily distorted as they circle and bob, transfixed on a silvery pole to which half-terrified and half-delighted kids hang on and ride. Like all such carousels, this one unapologetically violates principles of aesthetic restraint, nightmarishly stunning as it spins to blaring music above the water.

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