Changes made to .ll. -- and changes to come

Have been travelling and writing, so it's only today that I have got back to this site, posting the first Letter from San Francisco by Berkeley writer Guy Tiphane and a new banner photograph by Judith Lermer Crawley.

A Letter from Berlin will be following by Christina Lembrecht, and I'm working on one or two others, including a regular film spot. Am also open to suggestion from writers who might have something to report from their corner of the world.

When I realized how big the international readership is of this site, I wanted to go out of my way to present material that will keep you visiting -- and encourage you to contribute your own thoughts.

Other changes in the works include introducing fiction and poetry in translation into English -- and, in the weeks to come, a new blog entirely in French. Not to mention, it's easier than ever to sign up and comment. The traffic is rising quickly -- we've drawn over 5,000 visitors in September, even though the site has been quiet for half the month -- and seems likely to continue bringing readers from all over together to talk about everything books are about.

And then, of course there will be the books themselves, which I will be starting to publish in the new year. Watch this space.

More and more people are stepping forward, making suggestions, and getting involved. Which is more and more fun, of course, and more and more work, as well, for a growing number of writers, reviewers, translators and photographers, as well as for myself.

So I am reminded of Phyllis Papoulias's great photo of a duck, which you might remember  from the spring, when it was the banner photo for several weeks.

Here it is again, a gentle reminder to be serene on the surface while paddling hard underneath.

Linda Leith

.ll.

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More articles

From Guy Tiphane: Letter from San Francisco

Can machines select the next book for you to read? In this view of the future, a book's DNA can be compared to your “reader DNA,” and the bookseller – no longer a human but a machine automatically channeling books to you – is guaranteed growing sales forever.

Better than Downton Abbey: Nabokov's Ecstasy

By Linda Leith

"This is ecstasy, and behind the ecstasy is something else, which is hard to explain. It is like a momentary vacuum into which rushes all that I love."

-- Vladimir Nabokov

Report from the Future II: Montreal’s Literary Avant-garde

I hate to break this to you, Ladies and Gentlemen – especially if you’re still in denial about the digital revolution – but the literary future includes not only electronic books, but words and images dancing on a screen, with voice and music and other sound effects.

Bertrand Gervais

Scottish Stones, part II, by Kenneth Radu

I had read Andrew Lang’s collections of fairy tales as a child and later as an adult. In university I also read David Hume’s philosophy, which provided a pathway out of dingles and a ladder out of wells of wishful thinking. Through fantasy or fact, the geography of dramatic basalt rock formations, covered in green, obviously came into being through the forces of eons for the sole purpose of providing dancing venues under moonlight and feeding our insatiable need for stories.

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