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The Literary Life [Part 1 of 2]: A day to bottle?

Is there a way of bottling the good reviews? Steeping them in brine? Or, given the wintry day, flash-freezing them so that there they'll be ready to cheer me up all over again another day?

Photo: Linda Leith

Review of A Wicked Company

by Kenneth Radu

Wicked company, therefore, is to be understood as the hostile official attitude towards men (mostly men) of intellectual daring who challenged the assumptions of religion and society. Inconvenient thinkers could be imprisoned and atheists could still be executed at the time, a practice I believe some would wish to continue today. That was the purpose of the radical salon: room for a coterie of free thinkers to converse bravely on many subjects, including dangerous critiques of the ancien régime and the Church, without fear of reprisal, at least from their fair hostess.

For a Literary Salon

Contributing editor Marie-Andrée Lamontagne’s introductory text for the French online Salon .ll. argues that literature has never thrived as much as it does today, when it has all but disappeared from sight.

Translation by Jonathan Kaplansky.

Contributing editors Felicia Mihali, Marie-Andrée Lamontagne, and Annabelle Moreau planning the  
literary salon, October 2011.

          

        

         
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